Special Education: NOT the Resource Room, the Classroom in the Trailer, or the Special School Across Town

Print Friendly

Does my daughter, who has an IEP, have to be served by resource classes or can she be totally in mainstream classrooms?

“Special education” under IDEA is not a place or placement or a pre-packaged program. Special education is a “service for children rather than a place where such children are sent.”

Special education is not the resource room, the classroom in the trailer, or the special school across town.

The IDEA includes a “least restrictive environment” (LRE) requirement.

LRE Requirement in IDEA

Special education services should be delivered in regular education classes (not special classes, separate schooling, or other removal from the regular ed environment) except “when the nature or severity of the disability of the child is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.”

20 U. S. C. § 1412(a)(5) – See page 72 in Wrightslaw: Special Education Law or Chapter 10 – Placement in Wrightslaw: All About IEPs.

If the IEP of a student with a disability can be implemented satisfactorily with the provision of supplementary aids and services in the regular classroom in the school the student would attend if not disabled, that placement is the LRE placement for that student.

The “I” in IEP

When school personnel view special education as a “place,” they often fail to evaluate the child’s unique needs and how the school can meet these needs.

That’s the “I” in IEP. “What we have available” usually refers to one-size-fits-all programs that are not individualized to meet a child’s unique needs.

And remember, parents are members of any team that develops the IEP and decides on placement. IDEA Section 1414(e) requires that the school “…ensure that the parents of each child with a disability are members of any group that makes decision on the educational placement of their child.”

Read Parent Involvement in Placement Decisions at http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/?p=394

More about Inclusion, LRE, and Mainstreaming at http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/lre.index.htm

Leave a Reply

77 Comments on "Special Education: NOT the Resource Room, the Classroom in the Trailer, or the Special School Across Town"

Notify of

10/19/2016 7:46 pm

My son is on an IEP and in second grade the special education teacher worked in small groups in the classroom with other children on IEPs. This year, 3rd grade, he is being pulled out during the day and he is a mess. He requires consistency and being pulled form the classroom at different times of day makes his day very unpredictable. He also is frustrated because he misses out on things that he enjoys in the class, like reading, snack and he has even sometimes quizzes. He was interrupted taking a math quiz today and he was so upset. I’m not sure what to do. I wish the school continued with a model where kids are included in the classroom and the teacher works in small groups in the actual class room. I’m pretty desperate. I called for an IEP meeting in two weeks to discuss this.

09/21/2016 1:48 pm

I have a question concerning the placement of a severe and profound student in my son’s class. Why have they mainstreamed this student with very limited capabilities in the resource classroom. My son comes home everyday and says that the child sits in the room and makes all types of load noises. The students in the class snicker and occasionally laugh. She is confined to a wheel chair and has an assistant that takes her around the school. Every time I have visited the school and seen her she has been very load and out spoken. Just the other day my son was in class taking a test and the child was making noises. My son said that he couldn’t concentrate on his test due to the distraction. I guess what I am asking is why would they put a student in a class that clearly isn’t learning anything and at the same time being a distraction and keeping those other students from getting the education they are in there for? It is very disturbing to me that the school system would allow it but even more disturbing that the wellfare of the whole class is not taken into consideration. If anyone can make since of this for me please share your incite with me.
Thank you

09/24/2016 3:32 pm

Hi Sandy,
Unfortunately, both you and your son sound uninformed. And fortunately, you don’t get to have a say in whether or not that child with a disability is learning anything from being in the classroom. I encourage you to have an in depth conversation with the teacher to find out what is really happening in the classroom. I also encourage you to learn more about this child with a disability, what his or her parents envision for their child, and go out into the real world and see that there are people with many different abilities. I could and would love to write more; however, I have talked and worked with individuals like yourself and have come to realize that people like you will probably never understand. Too bad. Mostly I feel bad for you.

09/25/2016 7:42 pm

So what you are saying is that it is perfectly ok that when this student is being disruptive in class and distracting due to their severe and profound disability, not to mention distracting the focus of those students that are trying to learn, even during a test, is perfectly ok? It seems you agree that a child that is uncontrollable verbally is perfectly fine to be in a class and be disruptive and have it justified by their disability. The students in this class aren’t able to concentrate or learn. I understand the advocacy for the disabled and mentally challenged but when its at the expense of a whole class’ education I don’t see where that makes any sense at all. I thank you for your answer and see your side but unfortunately it seems to me that your side is all you see. Take care

10/18/2016 7:50 pm

Hi Sandy– I think the others are being rather rude to you and I think it comes w/ the territory of just being over -tired. I have a son with an IEP and I have a son who is gifted. Both are on the autism spectrum as am I, their mother. There is not a perfect answer to your question. I don’t think it’s fair for your son to be distracted during a test, although it is a good opportunity for you to explain to him that the other child can’t help it. I think IEP’s are good but I also think there’s an issue when the IEPs trump the majority’s right to an education free of distractions. Is the “real” world like that? No– but guess what?! Most of the real world is not anything like school. What if her son got a 504 or IEP saying he needed a quiet environment to test in?

10/04/2016 5:18 pm

Sandy, the point is that yes the student’s verbalization *IS* justified by their disability. Some stim/tic vocally- they literally can not help it. Being confined to a wheelchair does not indicate intelligence, but it sounds like it affects how you view her. I work with students of all “outward” abilities & yes some are very LOUD…but you’d be surprised how much they are taking in &, given the right tools (comm device/ASL), how much they can tell you!
In the real world it is often not quiet when we’re trying to focus (driving with the radio on is another good example) so view it as practice. Sorry but blaming lack of focus on others is an excuse.
As for your son this would be a wonderful teaching moment. Help him to accept everyone and see that everyone’s education matters 🙂

09/11/2016 4:07 pm

Special Education should be a service not a place, but if the “service” is in a general education classroom, how do parents make sure the proper support is being provided to ensure their child is learning and gaining new skills ? My district has 53 unfilled paraeducator positions open, the district next to ours has 89 open unfilled positions. Talk is cheap, students with special needs are being included in general education classroom but are not accessing the curriculum because there is no support. #reality check.

09/18/2016 5:19 pm

Exactly! Our daughter has been in school for 12 days and still hasn’t received her general education service minutes. The new teacher says she too overwhelmed and needs to get to know the students. The assistant principal says due to shortage of teachers and paras they need to find what best supports the students including our daughter and that its temporary. When asked the teacher how long is the temporary she said it’s not her responsibilty to know she don’t do placements. The district considers our daughter stocking shelves unloading inventory boxes in a student store is part of her general education service minutes. They will not allow her to be in cooking / home economics class because the general education teacher can’t support her. We got limited general minutes 350 for the year.

09/04/2016 1:41 am

My son is starting high school this week and we just went to tour his classes. He’s in a self contained classroom and switches classes for each subject. Only non special ed class is theater. All 7 special Ed classes are in outside trailers. Isn’t this illegal? It’s extremely segregating. How do they expect them to feel included?

09/18/2016 5:22 pm

Yes it is and we are in the same boat our daughter only gets Arts and Advisory but that’s limited to a 350 minutes for the year. The IDEA states our kids should be given the same opportunity as general peers also I recommend checking your state law for what it says for what it says. I live in Washington state it’s says our kids are entitled.

08/31/2016 11:19 am

My son is beginning a ne school district this year. Upon registration, and prior to fully reviewing his fba, bip, or iep, I was contacted by the school and told they do not have placement for him. His previous school had him in a 6:1 classroom. The new school only has 12:1 classroom and they’re claiming it’s full. They want to provide transportation to a neighboring district with a 6:1 self contained classroom.
Can they amend his iep and put him in a mainstream class with a one on one support? Do we have to have him transported somewhere else?
I moved with the intent of my son going to this school. We live three blocks from it (we moved for the purpose of changing districts)
His annual iep review concluded with the goal for this year to be mainstreaming him anyway.

08/11/2016 3:50 pm

I am a general Ed teacher – with special Ed certification and a background in serving BD students. My principal has decided to cluster students to better serve them. They placed all of the students with BD/Health Impaired (history of significant behavior difficulties) at my grade level in my classroom this year. I will have 6 out of 22 students on IEPs (27%). 5 are severe. Is this a violation of the LRE provisions of IDEA?

09/25/2016 8:34 am

Amy, it is not a violation of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), unless more than 50% of your students are being served through Special Education. It does make it difficult to have a class with students struggling with behavior problems but districts do this so that they can provide services to students. Hopefully, they have provided help for you during those class periods.

05/04/2016 6:22 pm

I am a regular education teacher who has several students with IEPs in my class. Their IEPs state that they are to be pulled out of the regular classroom by their special education teacher and serviced in a resource room for 75 to 150 minutes a day. My students have not been pulled for the past 3 months. The special education teachers have been individually testing students rather than servicing the students on IEPs. My principal told me today in a meeting that I was responsible for servicing these children and the special education teachers were just a resource. If that were true what do we need special education teachers for? Has anyone experienced this before?

06/03/2016 11:08 am

The principal, special education teacher and you could get in big trouble from the state for not following the IEP. If this ever came to light, you would most likely be the only one fired. No to mention the effect it would have on the children who are to be getting the service. Shame on the principal this is criminal! Stating in a legal document that you are providing a service when you know you are not and then expecting one teacher to provide for all the children!! Everybody looses

05/20/2016 9:57 am

Irene, I think you need to reach out to these special ed teachers and be proactive as to what each student needs help on. The key word here is RESOURCE. They are not only a disabled students resource but they can be your resource. You can’t rely on a principal to tell these Special Ed teachers to teach these children. Sometimes you have the think out of the box a do the thing that you feel in your heart is the right. I am sure that your principal would not scold you for that. Especially if you are helping a student get on the right track. Being a teacher is not easy and I know that. But when you become a teacher, I believe that you have an obligation to do what it takes to help your students achieve. Somebody taught you to be better person. As a teacher now its your turn to teach them

01/18/2016 6:05 pm

First. Special Education needs to be integrated in every regular classroom. A regular class with para professionals can help remedy the situation. Second, Elementary schools need to be smaller Regular class size(10 to 15 students).Why do you think there are more elementary schools than middle or high schools? So that a young student(especially a special ed student) can start off in a small environment. You start off small and end up big. That’s with everything in life.Third, Special education students not only need a quality education, but also quality social skills where they can be mentored and respect by other students. Putting all Special educations students in one class together is a ticking time bomb waiting to explode. Lastly,When I mean that Special Education should be fully integrated in all classrooms,It should be in all classrooms in every elementary school in a particular town so that students don’t have to go cross town for special education services.

10/19/2016 1:41 pm

Many teachers would disagree and so would the students. The new trend is mainstreaming and it is not a one size fits all! In many cases, it is a detriment and disserve to the students and I mean ALL students! It has gotten to the point that only certain students matter. I teach all students and I can tell you, it is a great disservice to all students. The higher kids are not getting pushed and the lower kids aren’t getting what they need. In a perfect world, it works, but we all now the world is far from perfect! I also hate it when someone who has been out of a classroom for years decided to chime in. Schools have changed ALOT! Also, many EC teachers will tell you that many kids are mainstreamed, because of what the parent WANTS, not what the child needs!

09/04/2016 3:30 pm

What happens when students with special needs are integrated into general ed classrooms with minimal or no support? Our district cut para support in half, then they rolled out the full inclusion program. It is chaos. Teachers and students are unhappy, frustrated. Administrative response is,” All the other districts are doing it.”

03/28/2015 1:41 pm

I’m an adaptive behavior teacher in Texas and this program separates children into separate adaptive behavior classes where they are supposed to earn their way out. These kids all have a diagnosis of emotional disturbance and I think this program discriminates against them on the basis of their disability. Who can I complain to about this?

10/19/2016 1:45 pm

What are they going to do when that emotional disturbance lands them in jail or in a ward somewhere? Behavioral students do need to learn that they will be separated from others, if they don’t use behavior modifications. The real world won’t care about their disability. They will end up in jail, or the disability will land them in a hospital.

04/29/2016 6:12 am

Look up Georgia GNETS DOJ decision or download this PDF of the investigation results. GNETS is a behavior program that was ruled in violation of ADA for several reasons. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.ada.gov/olmstead/documents/gnets_lof.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwj3mN63nLHMAhXBQiYKHeeRAwoQFggiMAI&usg=AFQjCNEbekEyH81UHMkAr_dCOxHaTvUfkw&sig2=I9KLxXHLy4F9IbIPq7Ripw

09/03/2015 10:25 pm

I would love an answer to that myself. As a special educator in a new district I’m shocked at the way the students on my caseload are placed in my room all day with very little effort to include them in general Ed. When I try to suggest anything different I’m told that just how it’s done in my new district.

09/14/2014 5:00 pm

If a child has been resource for their services but administration wants more inclusion, is that a change of placement? The student is LD or OHI. The inclusion is with a special ed teacher in the room with the student instead of pulling him out for the entire time. For example, “joe” has 5 times 30 minutes per week on his IEP. So instead of being pulled out of his regular ed classroom that entire time, he is in the classroom with his peers with the SPed teacher.

08/05/2014 9:42 pm

Question: A parent has requested that her child be placed in a separate setting classroom because of his anxieties although he qualifies for resource continuum. The EC director has told students parent that he could get into separate setting. Isn’t there a protocol that must be followed before student is just placed in a separate setting? Student is currently on grade level in reading and writing and slightly below average in math. Current separate setting is serving students who are K-5, but all are working on kindergarten/ first grade level. All students have significant cognitive and adaptive skills. The student who is being requested to be placed in separate setting has neither. What is the law regarding this?

W Sarow
06/22/2014 9:26 pm

Inadequate service provision amongst the Deaf community in Deaf Education is an issue I’m passionate about. I don’t believe the LRE for Deaf students is in the mainstream classroom. These promote language barriers and isolation and lack positive Deaf role models for children. Clearly there are reasons to support state residential schools as the LRE for Deaf students. They don’t promote the language barriers inherent in “regular” education classrooms or the isolation of being followed around by an interpreter all day long as a student. I strongly support this “segregated” residential school setting as the LRE for Deaf students for the reasons cited above and my own personal experience as a parent. I’m a supporter of Deaf residential schools as the LRE for Deaf students especially profoundly Deaf students.

04/09/2014 5:56 pm

Wow!! some interesting information here. So sad to not here all the good things that the Special Education staff do. In my district we provide the full continuum of services. However, each child is regarded as a General Education student first and then it is determined what services are needed from there. I can tell you, working with the Sped. Department has gotten me a lot further than accusing them and being mean–they are human beings and care– just give them the chance before assuming they are doing something wrong or bad.

09/28/2013 2:45 pm

Reading the previous comments baffle my mind. As a preservice teacher, studying Early Childhood and Special Education, I have been exposed to the different types of interventions and supports teachers should be using to help their students.There are many supports that teachers could use in mainstream classrooms to help the students with disabilities. An example of a behavioral support that can be used in the classroom is Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS). This will focus on positive reinforcement of behaviors rather than the negative and it will make the instruction process run more smoothly. As for instruction, teachers that have inclusion classrooms, should incorporate Universally Designed Lessons (UDL) that help ALL students learn. The RTII approach will help teachers further implement supports for those who need it

02/27/2013 2:38 am

To Carol: I just learned today about using mediators for situations like this. I have the same problem w my sons school not hearing me about his anxiety – he refuses to go to school approx once a month, calls from nurses office etc. they just keep saying how they don’t see what I’m talking about and his grades are fine. I’m in NYS and there are mediators specifically for Special Ed problems. I’m hoping all states have something like this. I was told by them to ask for their involvement t sooner rather than later when the damage is done (like in my situation where the principal and dir of special Ed and even the superintendent all hate me).
The other thing I did was access our county’s mental health dept through a parent advocate and have just been approved for a case manager for my son bc of his mental illness and problems in school.

01/28/2013 7:07 am

my son has a history of behavior problems… he is too smart for resource ..so in order to stay in regular classes they assigned an aide .. he has gone into deep depression . he is in 7th grade and said now he looks like the ultimate geek. The school will not remove the aide and he is rufusing to go to school today! i am really concerned about his mental health as i have mentione to the school. which they seem to disregard. They just keep telling me that “its working ,the aide is working”… when it is not ..them seem to have no regard for his emotions… any advice would be greatly appreciated,

04/15/2016 7:18 pm

Carol do you still want help for him? Does he want to be in a room of kids like him? What does he need? My son was mainstreamed with an aide and pulled out of class when he was disruptive. They called me constantly. Finally I said look if you can’t handle him then put him in a place that they can. They kept him hawing around and going under the table after him and making him worse. I had parents telling me how abusive she was and when I contacted the teacher he’d act like he knew nothing. One day my son come home with tiny bruises all over his legs and he told me kids were throwing pebbles at him. The new ignorant principle said , his aides always with him. Well she took her lunch at this time.this aide put her thumb nail in my sons thumb and it became infected. i went after her.

04/15/2016 4:15 pm

First of all its not about how smart he is . It’s about his behaviors. I had to deal with this to. As mothers it’s frustrations because we know what our children need. Just mention that you’ve spoken with a lawyer and if your child doesn’t get what he needs enforce it

01/29/2016 10:19 pm

You can send a letter to the school district that you refuse special education services for your son. Then, the district will no longer be responsible in providing the aide. Your son will then be in a regular classroom without the aide.

10/30/2012 10:00 pm

My son is a 4th grader dx’d with pdd nos, adhd and mood do nos. He’s under the ED classification w/an IEP. While going thru a med change, in a regular classroom (4 years successfully with supports), they refused to work quickly to update his IEP. They traumatized him, humiliated him in front of his peers because they are untrained & tried to suspend him due to behaviors. They are not able to provide what he needs. the only program that is, is a special ed self contained classroom on a campus that has run a school that has 7 self containes, 11 regular ed classes. They have a culture of mainstreaming and acceptance. It is not LRE, the rest of the district is not in compliance with IDEA2004, no lawyers will do anything to help.

08/23/2016 6:40 pm

You Know! I am going through something similar, And I am afraid that I won’t know how to help my Son, He is in the 5th grade, but it seems that he hardly knows anything, I struggle to get him to do his homework, he barely knows how to read, and to top it off he gets humiliated at school by his teachers when they stand him to read out loud in front of the whole class. He doesn’t want to go to school any more. He also has ADHD, and he can’t seem to stay still for long periods of time.

10/19/2016 2:50 pm

Did you help your son with his reading, when he was in kindergarten or first grade? Kids do not learn to read without help from home. It has be enforced at home! Yes, some kids it comes to more natural to than others, but if the first time your kid ever had anything read to him was when he started school, he started way behind anyway or if he didn’t know his letters. Parents need to step up too!

09/27/2012 4:20 pm

A student has severe-profound disabilities and has been receiving service from a county program which provides intensive services that fit the child’s needs. The parents have requested that this student be enrolled in a school in his home district. The district does not have an SD classroom or the services available that the county program provides. If the district school is not appropriate to fit the childs needs; Who has the responsiblity to provide FAPE?

04/18/2012 10:42 pm

My 10th grader has been in co-taught science since 6th gade. the school stopped offering co-taught Earth Science. So the only ‘choice’ they gave us was an unsupported Regents course or an ‘upper level’ SGI class. Funny thing is that the 6 students in her SGI class are all students that WOULD have been in co-taught if it was available. Now I find out that in 11th grade there is NO support for math classes …. no co-taught, resource room or anything else. I would love to know what happened to LRE and a free and appropriate education for all students ….. my district does not seem to understand that concept!

05/25/2011 2:45 pm

Can my school combine special needs children with bad behavior children? Is this legal?

01/26/2011 1:19 am

MY son has Aspergers and his Doctors and Therpist have written letters to the school saying he should have small groups. I am totaly confused. I cannot get a straight answer from my son school about placements. I know there is no exact number, by law, for self contained classes, inclusion, co teaching. But where do they draw the line. My son IEP says self contained, small group, modified work.
My son has been in self contained always with less than 10 kids now the school says the class with 17 kids is self contained? One class has 30 kids a regular ed teacher and a special ed teacher. His DR. wrote the school a letter recomending an alternative Gym setting and I was told they do not have a setting for that but they would look into it.
Could you tell me if there is anything written about the ratios in these classes.

Sharon L.
01/23/2011 9:53 pm

Gina – Perhaps a modification to the curriculum will help. For example if there are 50 problems to do will your son learn how to do the problems and get enough practice if he only does 25 of them (every other one)? We did this with my son and it worked well. He learned what he needed to learn and did not become overwhelmed because it took him longer to do the work. He is dyslexic and we had the tutor read the word problems to him. He had the use of a calculator since 5th grade (even though the school did not like that idea). He needed this and still uses it today in college. Perhaps some of these ideas will help.

01/21/2011 3:59 pm

my son is having difficulty with 6 grade math. he has aspergers. he is passing. complaining non stop how tired it makes him, boring and confusing it is. i thought resource room would help him. he has a para which im sure helps him pass by not missing material but what about the frustration and extra energy he exerts to do so…he is falling apart when he gets home and says its math??
they say resource is for kids that fail only and truthfully is it LRE any other suggestions for his emotional, social, behavioral disability and how it affects him learning math. not to mention the comorbid add (main cause im sure)
is resource room the answer and how do i get it for him?

12/11/2010 4:05 pm

My 12 yr old daughter has high functioning autism. She had a full time aide in 1st and 2nd grade. After that, she was independent in the classroom. Since she started middle school, the regular education staff pushed for her to have an aide. They’ve made little attempt to modify their curricuulum or environment to serve her needs.

My daughter’s behavior has become so disruptive and her anxiety has skyrocketed. Recently an aide was hired. I was told by a para that the school is thinking about placing my daughter in a self contained CD classroom. She doesn’t have a CD label – her only label is autism. Can her school place her there? That doesn’t sound like the LRE. I would love some feedback.

Sharon L.
11/07/2010 8:52 pm

Beth – Definately you need to address it. In situations like this I contacted the school and asked to come in and observe the class. This way you can see what is going on and what you think about it. If you child is unhappy and you don’t like what you see you can reconvene an IEP meeting to discuss other options.

11/06/2010 9:58 pm

My daughter has 60 pullout minutes for SPEd services, but due to her schools academic leveled grouping for reading and math, she is sent to a theraputic self contained classroom for over 3 hours of her school day to work with 2 Sped teachers and their paras. Is this legal?? They say I should not complain because she us getting more specialized help, but I am very concerned about the role modeling and her self image of needing to go to be in the special class for kids who cannot behave. She has no behavioral issues- now…

Sp teacher
02/18/2016 9:02 pm

Students with learning disabilities shouldn’t be pulled into a self-contained ED rooms when they don’t have the ED identification. I would suggest getting an educational advocate and request to hold another IEP meeting.

10/26/2010 12:29 pm

My daughter is in a resource room and I had to fight to keep her there. The school pushed hard for her to be in a regular classroom. She wasn’t able to learn and her anxiety went through the roof (outbursts, tears, tearing off toenails, biting herself).

This website and the people on it helped me successfully fight to keep her in a smaller and calmer environment where she is happy and excelling at her own pace. I think this site is a great one and always recommend it as a good resource for parents.

10/25/2010 7:31 pm

Resource Rooms are actually quite beneficial to students with many types fo disabilities. Not all, but many with LD. This website seems to sensationalize issues rather than provide much-needed information to parents. Resource rooms provide the “individualized” instruction you mention in the IEP. How is this possible in the class of 30+???? Stop generalizing, and pushing your axe grinding agenda…

10/14/2010 12:51 pm

To Carol…I had the same problem with recess. You let them know it is absolutely NOT ok for your child to miss recess they will have to find another time. Children have few play/exercise times scheduled in the school day, your child needs this break and release of energy. This also feels like more of a punishment to your child. What are they thinking?

10/14/2010 12:48 pm

to Nicole My son is in doing fabulous in our Magnet school and has an IEP. Do NOT allow them to exclude your child!

K McMullen
10/14/2010 12:03 am

Regarding a foster child with Aspergers Syndrome. Child has and IEP Child makes A’s and B’s Aspergers children have severe social/emotional deficiencies. In the IEP meetings the school staff decides as to how the childs educational needs will be met; however, the school NEVER follows through. The IEP, in this case, is a collosal waste of everyone’s time. Is there recourse available to require/enforce what was set up in the IEP? I am new to all this and admit to being clueless. Are there laws which govern … for the state of KS and how can I get advise. I am not opposed to hiring an attorney to help but how do I find the professional necessary and what happened to “no child left behind”? The school staff tells me, for example A,B & C.. then I explain to the child. Then when I am not @ the school the staff chanages everything

Sharon L.
10/13/2010 5:43 pm

K Hopkins – My suggestion is to reconvene the IEP meeting and find out what is going on. If your child is supposed to be in regular education classes with his grade level they need to do so.

10/13/2010 12:05 pm

Martha, this is confusing to me. The school told me that this benchmark is a practice for the TAKS test the students take in April. The school also told me that if a student doesn’t pass this test then they can not be promoted to the next grade. This is why I am so stressed out about this. What can I do??

10/13/2010 10:19 am

To Shelby, whose child did not perform well on the benchmark test, but otherwise earns good grades…This is the crux of the problem with the No Child Left Behind Act. Students who may be below grade level for reasons of cognitive, emotional, or other reasons, make progress at their instructional level. If a 5th grader is making progress in reading, even though his reading level is closer to 3rd grade…he is learning, and showing progress (daily work, classroom tests). That same child takes the State-wide assessment tests (in NH = NECAP) at the grade level he is in – not his instructional level. If its a reading test, there is no accommodation to have test read to him. The problem is NCLB does not require that states test student progress, it requires them to test how far away from the average, a student is.

10/12/2010 10:00 pm

Yes, but read that law again as it states “parents are MEMBERS of the team” present but not heard; they always seem to have a better way. their way of handling situations rather than my input or how I would like a situation handled.

What are my rights here? I do not want my 5th grader to miss recess because his teacher thought it was the best time for him to download his work done on his Alpha Smart he desperately needs. I was told this remark by his teacher: “I’ll consider it.”

I have to wonder–is it IEP? Individual Education Plan?? or is it TEP? Teacher Education Plan??

10/12/2010 2:32 pm

What if the school flat refuses to acknowledge your child’s disability? There is no one to support you and make the school do what is not only right but is the law.

10/12/2010 12:01 pm

My son is in the 3rd grade and he has a 504 plan. He recently took a benchmark test which is a “practice” test for the TAKS he will have to take in April. On the benchmark he got a 40 something in reading and a 50 something on math. The school told me that the reason he did so poorly was because he couldn’t have accommodations on the reading portion. He made all A’s and B’s on daily work/tests so why is it that he did so poorly. My question is what are they doing to “help” him get such good daily work/test grades? Now they want him to come to morning computer tutoring and he is already getting tutoring 4 days a week plus going to content mastery to complete almost all of his daily work/tests and they want him to bring home extra “practice” work to complete at home. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks!

10/12/2010 9:59 am

My 7 year old daughter has mild to moderate Down Syndrome. She has had an IEP that wants her to replace “no” with a compliant behavior. Her behavior has gotten worse, and that regression shows on her progress reports. I have told them that we do not have this behavior issue in other daycare, camp,etc environments – just at school. She is in Lifeskills and is imitating the behavior of others in the room, however they won’t give us information on the classroom environment and said that a BIP was not needed. So we have formally requested a FBA with the school. But two weeks ago, she came biting herself on her wrist and we are concerned with this new behavior she has learned in this classroom. The teacher says their answer is to ignore the behavior. We know her placement is wrong, what can we do?

10/12/2010 9:00 am

Our School District kept our son on the 1st grade level for 4 yrs and the 2nd grade level for 5 yrs not allowing him to progress at all academically using the same IEP goals since 1st grade. In 9th grade after the School failed to provide our son with a FAPE we filed a DPH and Prevailed. Our son was moved to another School District as a 10th grader and lives in a Developmental Center to continue his education. The School immediately evaluated him and found he was on a 3rd grade level and he progressed very well with no regression. This year he is on a 3-4th grade level and has strong Math and Science Skills. Our son is due to return to our home District for his Senior year. This shows what a poor quality of education some School Districts provide and their Special Ed students education isn’t important.

K Hopkins
10/12/2010 8:57 am

My son is in 5th grade. He has been placed in what is being called an EC cluster class. There are 8 other 5th graders and the rest are 4th graders( 21 students in all) From my past experience of working at this school it appears to me the entire class is made up of children with some type of learning disability. My Son is with these children for the entire day. His specials, Music, Art, and Spanish are with 4th graders. He has not been retained. He was promoted to 5th grade but he has no interaction with his 5th grade peers except for a gym class once a week. His IEP has no restrictions for these special activities and his placement is written as “Regular” on his IEP. Is’nt he suppose to be with his regular education 5th grade peers for 80% of the day? That is what his IEP says. What is the definitionof “peers”?