Do Schools Have Any Legal Obligation to Identify and Test Students?

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Several weeks ago, someone who was using the Special Education Law and Advocacy Multimedia training program asked a question about the school’s legal obligation to identify and test students.

As a tutor who works with students struggling in reading and math, she was concerned about the number of her students who have never been tested or received any services, despite having continually performed below grade level.

These kids’ parents were unaware that they could request testing, or that their children might have a learning disability and be eligible for special education services.

Do you  have a struggling student?

If you have a student who is struggling and has not been evaluated or received any specialized help, read what IDEA 2004 says about the Child Find mandate.

As she learned more about advocacy, this tutor has helped parents request testing and get IEPs. She worries that for many kids, this is too little and too late. Many of her students were never identified and are now in middle school.

For parents, tutors, and others who read this and are not aware of these legal requirements – YES, schools are required to identify and evaluate all children who may have disabilities under the Child Find mandate. If you have a student who is struggling and has not been evaluated or received any help, read what IDEA 2004 says about Child Find.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act includes the Child Find mandate.  Schools are required to locate, identify and evaluate all children with disabilities from birth through age 21. (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(3))

The Child Find mandate applies to all children who reside within a State, including:

  • children who attend private schools and public schools,
  • highly mobile children,
  • migrant children,
  • homeless children, and
  • children who are wards of the state.

This includes all children who are suspected of having a disability, including children who receive passing grades and are “advancing from grade to grade.” (34 CFR 300.111(c)) The law does not require children to be “labeled” or classified by their disability. (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(3)(B); 34 CFR 300.111(d)).

For more information about these requirements, read “The Child Find Mandate: What Does it Mean to You?”

https://www.wrightslaw.com/info/child.find.mandate.htm

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Kat

My child entered a new school system in the 8th grade. Sh has constantly struggled since. Her grades have always been very low since the first year. She is now a senior in a credit recovery program. I recently requested her to be tested. It resulted in her being dx with cognitive impairment. No teacher or counselor has ever attempted to look into the reason she has struggled. Now she is behind on graduating on time. What is the schools accountability for this situation?

Chuck

I suggest contacting your state parent training and information center. They will know the options available in your state. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center

Kelli

I am a teacher and recently was told that it was illegal to tell a parent that a child should be tested for special education services.I am not a special education teacher, but I am a high school English teacher with 19 years of experience. This came from my building’s assistant superintendent that I could not mention testing at all to any parent of a high school student and was also told that at this point what would be the purpose or worthiness of special education services. I am disheartened and frustrated with having no admin support. I am just wondering if, legally, this is true and that they are accurate in telling me that I cannot mention testing. Thank you in advance for your response.

Leo

Have you initiated interventions and have documentation they are not working? Your school should have a RTI (response to intervention- may be called something different in your district) process which the child should go through before testing is discussed. It may not be illegal, but you need to follow the procedures set in place by your district for identifying children.

Chuck

It is not illegal to tell parents of their right to request that their child be evaluated to determine if a disability exists. Federal law gives schools the responsibility of identifying students who may have a disability. Texas is currently in trouble with the dept. of education because it did not monitor that schools were not meeting this responsibility. Special ed services can be provided by schools to age 21, and in some cases 26.

Debra

If my child has an IEP for ADHD and sensory integration disorder, and we meet with the school to request an evaluation for a learning disability in math are they required to test him? The school refused saying it was his lack of effort. He switched schools and they tested him. He clearly qualified for LD in math functioning on a first grade level when he was in fourth grade. Is there anything we can do? He struggled for two years needlessly because of one principals refusal to assess him.
Thank you!!

Chuck

You can contact your state education agency, & the state parent training and information center. Your state rules may allow you to get compensatory services from the previous school, especially if it is in the same district. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center

Kellie

My Grandson is 9 years old in 3rd grade Special education, and has a diagnosis of “development delayed”. He has been in Special education since Kindergarden, Now His teacher said he cannot turn 10 with just a diagnosis of just development delayed! We live in Mississippi, I am wondering if this is correct by Mississippi law???

Chuck

Federal rules in IDEA say that this label can be used for children 3-9. So it appears that they are referring to this part of the law. Your state parent training and information center can provide you with more information. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center

LisaD

My grandson has childhood apraxia since PreK. His kindergarten teacher did not understand his speech and he became a discipline problem. He was frustrated and acted out all year. We requested he be tested for Speech and the Diagnostician said on the phone prior to testing that he was Autistic. My son(parent) was upset because the testing not only covered Speech deficits, but a psychological evaluation also. At the ARD meeting we were told if we did not agree to the Autistic label he would not receive Speech therapy. In other words it was all or nothing.We told them we agree with the Speech label but not Autism unless diagnosed by a Child Clinical Psychologist. My grandson never received Speech help and we are seeking legal advice for the Texas School District for demanding such at the ARD.

martha

ok. So I kind of have a different thing going with my son and I am getting very frustrated with the school he is going to. My son had leukemia and missed basically the first two year of school because he was fighting for his life. When he started school in first grade as a repeat he was behind. The very first week of school I tried to get him help with 504 the school told me oh, I don’t need that they can do for him everything a 504 could do. being naive and trusting that they would really help my child I gave it up. About a month before school was out i got oh we can’t get your son where he needs to be so we got him a tutor to help him.Same thing happen this year as well, I just want the school to teach him and not try to group him. because he is more work.Do you have any Idea’s

Chuck

I suggest contacting your state parent training and information project. They will be familiar with your state rules and your rights. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center