Observation: GRANDPARENTS RIGHT TO CLASSROOM OBSERVATION

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Robyn:  I am a retired reading teacher and I work with my 8-year-old grandson who is struggling with his reading. He went to summer school in an enrichment, theme-based program and did not receive individual reading help. His parents are divorced and work (mother works at same school). My son and child’s mother would probably not want me involved.

Do I, as a taxpaying grandmother who wishes the best for her grandson, have a legal right to visit the classroom and remedial small group to observe the reading program of my grandson?

My grandson verbalizes that he doesn’t get any special help and no one has noticed that his reading is improving, I would just like to see an example of daily reading session(s) -in the classroom and in his academic intervention group.

The principal has informed me that I’m only the grandmother and that my son should take me with him to the parent conference. The divorced parents would not agree I should attend. Please help me help my grandson.

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Morning

It must be difficult, as a former reading teacher, to watch this play out with your grandson. I can sense your passion and heart in the post. There are other ways to get involved without crossing boundaries. You have clearly stated your opinion on this matter to those involved. Now, it is time to look at other ways without “crossing boundaries” to help him. Enrich his life in ways that will help him improve his reading. Enrichment is more than reading lessons– it is about experiencing life. Support his extracurriculars, take him to plays, cultural events, etc. Find out what he likes and help him bloom. My son loved dinosaurs. We visited museums, bought books, he went to dinosaur camp, built play models, etc. Allow the parents and the school to work as partners.

You say “I work with my 8-year-old grandson who is struggling with his reading” although “My son and child’s mother would probably not want me involved.” You ask if you “have a legal right to visit the classroom and remedial small group to observe the reading program of my grandson?”

The principal advised you that as a grandparent, you do not have a legal right to observe him in class. You didn’t accept this but posted the same question on Wrightslaw.

The principal is right.

I’m not optimistic that you will hear or accept our information either since it is at odds with what you want to hear.