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If You Have Questions about Your Child’s Reading – Ask…

12/23/10
by Wrightslaw

If you have a child who is  receiving “special education” reading instruction, you need information to participate in writing an appropriate IEP. This information could also help when you work with your child at home.

Find what questions to ask and a user-friendly form to record your answers.

Questions about Overall Reading Progress

  • Do you need accurate information about your child’s current reading level and what she is able to do?
  • Where does she need to improve?
  • Is there a difference between reading and understanding?
  • What can you and your child’s teacher do to improve weak areas?

Questions about Word Recognition, Sounds, and Fluency in Reading

  • Has your child ever been tested for language and sound awareness?
  • Do you know what strategies your child’s teacher is using to help her recognize words and work through difficult sounds?

1. Do you have questions about reading comprehension and what you can do to help your child understand what she reads?

2. Do you know what your child’s other teachers are doing to meet her reading, writing, spelling needs?

You will also find a form to use when you ask questions  about Writing, Spelling, and Testing.

  • What impact does my child’s reading ability have on his spelling?
  • How is my son’s writing affected by his reading abilities?
  • Will my child be able to pass the state’s End-of-Grade test in reading?

Parents, educational consultants, teachers, professors from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Charlotte, and staff from the Exceptional Children’s Assistance Center compiled these questions regarding reading progress.

They also created a simple, easy to use form for Questions Parents Can Ask…About Reading Improvement. We’ve posted these forms on a Parent Resource page on the Fetaweb.com.

Use these questions to help you gather information about your child’s reading skills and progress when you speak to your child’s teacher or education specialist.

If you receive an answer you do not understand, ask to have it explained thoroughly.

Questions to Ask

http://www.fetaweb.com/read.questions.htm

Find more information here: Reading at Wrightslaw

http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/read.index.htm

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3 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Michelle 01/11/11 at 7:49 am

    My child is in 9th grade. She’s had a boatload of reading testing done that all indicates the same things: phonological processing is mostly intact with a few “weak” areas, fluency is at about 6th grade level, literal comp is at about the 5th grade level, inferrential comp about the 4th grade. This child has “solidly average” cognitive ability. No one disputes any of this info BUT at the high school level they actually do no real “remediation”. There is no specific reading “instruction” being provided–at this grade level the whole class reads a novel round-robin style, discusses what they’ve read, then answers some (very brief) written comp questions. That’s it. There is no real spelling or vocab instruction, either. And there is NO objective progress monitoring done in any area. How can I get her the help she needs?

  • 2 Jennifer 01/07/11 at 6:24 pm

    There is the TONI (Test of Nonverbal Intelligence). I’m not sure how old it is, or if there are updated versions.

  • 3 Casey 12/29/10 at 10:44 am

    My child is 10 and has CP….uses a AAC Device(Dynavox) to communicate. Is there a test that can measure his reading level and IQ since he is non-verbal???? I have an appt. with a Clinical Neuropsychologist and hoping he can help us.