Wrightslaw l No Child Left Behind l IDEA 2004 l Fetaweb l Yellow Pages for Kids l Harbor House Law Press
 Home > News > The Special Ed Advocate News November 23, 1999


The Special Ed Advocate
It's Unique ... and Free!

Enter your email address below:

 

2014 - 2015 Training Programs

Oct 23 - Wilton, CT

Oct 25 - Olympia, WA

Oct 30 - Phoenix, AZ

Nov. 1 - Grand Rapids, MI

Nov 6 - McAllen, TX

Nov 18 - DesMoines, IA

Nov 21 - Temecula, CA

Dec 4 - OKC, OK

Full Schedule

Be a Hero ...

 Jason at Ft. Benning
... to a Hero
Learn more

Wrightslaw

Home
Topics from A-Z
Free Newsletter
Seminars & Training
Consultations
Yellow Pages for Kids
Press Room
FAQs
Sitemap

Books & Training

Wrightslaw Books & DVDs
Wrightslaw Storesecure store lock
  Advocate's Store
  Student Bookstore
  Exam Copies
Training Center
Bulk Discounts
New! Military Discounts
Mail & Fax Orders

Advocacy Library

Articles
Doing Your Homework
Ask the Advocate
FAQs
Newsletter Archives
Summer School Series
Success Stories
Tips

Law Library

Articles
Caselaw
IDEA 2004
No Child Left Behind
McKinney-Vento Homeless
FERPA
Section 504
Fed Court Complaints

Topics

Advocacy
ADD/ADHD
Allergy/Anaphylaxis
Assistive Technology
Autism Spectrum
Behavior & Discipline
Bullying
College/Continuing Ed
Damages
Discrimination
Due Process
Early Intervention (Part C)
Eligibility
ESY
Evaluations
FAPE
Flyers
Future Planning
Harassment
High-Stakes Tests
Homeless Children
IDEA 2004
Identification & Child Find
IEPs
ISEA
Juvenile Justice
Law School & Clinics
Letters & Paper Trails
LRE/Inclusion
Mediation
Military / DOD
No Child Left Behind
NCLB Directories
NCLB Law & Regs
Parental Protections
PE and Adapted PE
Privacy & Records
Procedural Safeguards
Progress Monitoring
Reading
Related Services
Research Based Instruction
Response to Intervention (RTI)
Restraints/Abuse
Retention
Retaliation
School Report Cards
Section 504
Self-Advocacy
Teachers & Principals
Transition
Twice Exceptional (2e)
VA Special Education

Resources & Directories

Advocate's Bookstore
Advocacy Resources
Directories
  Disability Groups
  International
  State DOEs
  State PTIs
Free Flyers
Free Pubs
Free Newsletters
Legal & Advocacy
Glossaries
   Legal Terms
   Assessment Terms
Best School Websites

 

IDEA Compliance Report Delayed

November 20, 1999

WASHINGTON -- The parents, teachers and advocacy groups that have been eagerly awaiting the National Council on Disability's full report on state compliance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act will have to wait a couple more months. The report, which was first scheduled for release in mid-October, then pushed back to mid-November, is now expected to be available the last week of January or early February, NCD spokesman Mark Quigley said Thursday. The report details the ways in which all 50 states and the U.S. territories fail to meet the law's key requirements for providing free, appropriate public education for students with disabilities.

The NCD, an independent council appointed by the federal government to oversee disability issues in the schools, the workplace and other public areas, released preliminary results of its study in September. At that time, the council said 90 percent of states and territories fail to adequately supervise local education agencies' education of students with disabilities, and 88 percent do not comply with requirements to provide services to assist a student's transition from school to post-education activities. The study is based on the U.S. Department of Education's monitoring of state compliance with IDEA from 1994 to 1998.

The final report is being held back for two reasons, Quigley said. First, the council has given the U.S. Department of Education an opportunity to review the report and suggest revisions before the final version is released. The council affords this courtesy to every agency it evaluates, he said, noting the composition of the final report followed the same formula the council used for reviewing the air transport industry for compliance with the American Disabilities Act.

When releasing its preliminary IDEA findings, the NCD roundly criticized the Department of Education for its failure to hold states accountable and its failure to withhold federal funds from states that do not comply. But Quigley said the department's opportunity to review the final report does not necessarily mean those criticisms will be toned down.

"The department can make suggestions. Whether we go with them or not will be our call, and it'll be the final call," he said.

The second reason for the delay is political. The NCD believes it can make the biggest impact by releasing its full IDEA study when Congress is in session, rather than pass the document around to staffers while the members are still in their home districts for the holiday break, Quigley said. The NCD will hold a news conference to release its findings, with members of the disability community present to "humanize" some of the issues the report raises, he said. In addition, the council is angling for a hearing on the problem of noncompliance and has contacted staffers of Congressional offices to lobby for release of the study at such a hearing.

Meanwhile, the department of education continues to monitor states for compliance with the law. The agency's Office of Monitoring and State Improvement Planning has posted monitoring reports for 27 states and territories on its Internet site, and more are in the works, a department staffer said. The department has not posted reports for all of the states and territories because many are in the process of being written now, the staffer said. Monitoring is done on a five-year cycle, so any reports that are older than that period have not been put online, in anticipation of the more updated reports due out soon.

Some reports are also fairly old because the department suspended its monitoring operations for one year to revise its implementation strategy. Only three state reports- California, New Jersey and Pennsylvania have been posted so far this year, and three others - Mississippi, Oregon and the Virgin Islands -- were posted last year. The rest are more than two years old. At least one state -- North Dakota -- voluntarily posted the department's monitoring report on its special education division web site, even though the federal site does not yet list it.

NOTE: This report comes from http://www.specialednews.com   and FEAT at http://www.feat.org/FEAT

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon The Special Ed Advocate: It's Free!

 

Wrightslaw: Special Education Law, 2nd Edition, by Pam and Pete Wright
About the Book

Wrightslaw: All About IEPs
About the Book

Wrightslaw: All About Tests and Assessments
About the Book

Surviving Due Process: Stephen Jeffers v. School Board
About the DVD Video

 

Copyright 1998-2014, Peter W. D. Wright and Pamela Darr Wright. All rights reserved.

Contact Us | Press Mission l Our Awards l Privacy Policy l Disclaimer l Site Map