Answers to Your Questions About
Research Based Reading Programs

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November 27 , 2007

ISSN: 1538-3202

Issue: 413
Subscribers: 54,611

In This Issue:

Why Use Research Based Reading Programs?

Where Can I Find Research Based Programs & Assessments?

How Can I Get a Reading Program that Works?

Special Education Law and Advocacy Training on CD-ROM

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More Resources from Wrightslaw

Six Qualities of Effective Reading Programs
Preventing Reading Difficulties and Reading Failure

Doing Your Homework

Reading First and NCLB
 
 

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Pete and Pam Wright
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Copyright 2007, Peter W. D. Wright and Pamela Darr Wright. All rights reserved. Please do NOT reprint or host on your website without explicit permission.

girl readingThis week we'll look at research based reading programs. First, we have two questions for you:

  • Is your child's reading program researched based?
  • Is the teacher adequately trained to use this program?

Sue Whitney Heath, who writes about reading, research based instruction, and creative advocacy strategies in Doing Your Homework, answers your questions about reading programs, reading assessments, and how to get a better reading program for your child.

Sue also provides answers to this perplexing question: "Why do schools continue to use reading programs that are not based on research?
"

Please don't hesitate to share this issue with other families, teachers or professionals.


Why Use Research Based Reading Programs?

You have questions about reading and research based reading programs.

A parent asks: "According to IDEA and NCLB, is it true that Reading Specialists are supposed to be using a research based program with all of their special education students?"

Sue says, "Yes."

In Why Use Research Based Reading Programs?, Sue explains the reasoning behind these requirements:

"To my knowledge, no research has ever shown any program to be effective if :

  • the teacher is not trained in the program
  • the teacher did not use the program as it was intended to be used or,
  • with the group for whom it was designed to be used."

Read more articles about reading and research based instruction by Sue Whitney Heath in Doing Your Homework.

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Where Can I Find Research Based Programs & Assessments?

In Why Use Research Based Reading Programs?, Sue answers more questions about reading and research based reading programs:

"Are regular classroom teachers supposed to be using a research based reading program with the general education population?"

"Where can I can find lists of research based reading programs and reading assessments?"

"What are progress monitoring assessments?"


What Are Progress Monitoring Assessments?

Progress monitoring assessments are used to measure growth in short amounts of time. Some assessments are not sensitive enough to measure all the components of reading.

In this article, you will also find a link to the Review of Progress Monitoring Tools from the National Center on Student Progress Monitoring.

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How Can I Get a Reading Program That Works?

In Reading Fluency - How Can I Get a Program That Works?, Sue advises a parent who is concerned about her son's reading program - and his progress.

boy reading"My son is in the 6th grade, but reads at a 3rd grade level.

"After 6 weeks in his reading program, his fluency went from 54 words per minute to 71. Is this improvement large enough?"

Sue says, "No." She explains that oral reading fluency norms rank 71 words per minute as a first grade level.

She also explains why the child's current reading program will not get him to a 12th grade reading level by the time he is scheduled to graduate.

In Reading Fluency - How Can I Get a Program That Works?, Sue provides advice about how you can get appropriate reading instruction that will meet your child's needs. She offers a plan to obtain the knowledge you need to be an effective, educated member of your child's IEP team.

You also need to learn about special education law and advocacy. If you can't attend a live Wrightslaw training program, consider getting the Wrightslaw Special Education Law and Advocacy Training CD-ROM. (more information below)

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Special Education Law and Advocacy Training

Treat yourself for Christmas - get Wrightslaw Special Education Law and Advocacy Training on CD-ROM.

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Special Education Law & Advocacy Training
with Pete & Pam Wright

A small investment in this instructional CD will increase your advocacy skills big-time. Learn more

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