IEPs for Behavior Problems,
Assessments & Interventions

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May 16, 2007

ISSN: 1538-3202

Issue: 390
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If you are the parent or advocate for a child with behavior problems, you need to learn about rights and responsibilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Act. friends

In this issue of The Special Ed Advocate, we answer questions from parents and educators about what the law requires schools to do for children with behavior problems.

We also provide you with information and resources about Functional Behavior Assessments and Positive Behavioral Interventions.

P.S. Will you do us a favor? Will you forward this newsletter to a friend so your friend can get acquainted with The Special Ed Advocate? This beats forwarding your own copy -- which may cause your subscription to be unsubscribed if your friend clicks the wrong link. :-)

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In This Issue:
IDEA 2004: IEPs for Children with Behavior Problems
What Are Schools Required to Do for Children with Behavior Problems?
Functional Behavior Assessments & Behavioral Interventions: What Parents Need to Know
Functional Behavior Assessments: What? Why? When? Where? Who?
Just Published! My Brother Has Autism by Melody Igafo-Te'o
Wrightslaw Special Education Law & Advocacy Training

IDEA 2004: IEPs for Children with Behavior Problems

"My child has autism. Sometimes, he is disruptive and his behavior interferes with other children's learning. Must the IEP team develop a plan to address these problem behaviors?"

"Are school districts required to train teachers to use positive behavioral interventions and support?"boy at computer

"My child has ADHD and bipolar disorder. Does the IEP team have to address his behavioral needs in the IEP?

In What You Need to Know About IDEA 2004: IEPs for Children with Behavior Problems, Pat Howey answers questions from parents whose children have behavior problems.

IDEA 2004 and the federal special education regulations include specific requirements for IEPs of children whose behavior impedes their learning or the learning of other children, including training teachers to use positive behavioral interventions and strategies.

In IDEA 2004: IEPs for Children with Behavior Problems, Pat describes these requirements and offers strategies parents can use to request help.

Read more What You Need to Know about IDEA 2004 articles.

Read more articles by Pat Howey in Ask the Advocate.

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What Are Schools Obligated to Do for Kids with Behavior Problems?

"We have a 15 year old tenth grader who is 'seriously emotionally disturbed.' Academically, he is functioning at the 2nd grade level. He is placed in a self-contained classroom."

"Must we continue to provide special education services to him in this setting if we believe he is a danger to himself or others? What if the school has no alternative placement? What about the safety of teachers, school staff, and other students?"
 - Special educatorprincipal's office

In Behavior Problems: What Are Schools Obligated to Do? Pete describes the school's obligations to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to all children with disabilities.

Before the IEP team can develop an appropriate educational plan for this boy, the school needs to do good diagnostic testing.


Pete asks some hard questions.

  • What is driving the boy?
  • Why are his academic skills at the 2nd grade level?
  • Why is he not receiving remediation of academic skills?

After describing a treatment program he developed when he was a juvenile probation officer, Pete asks, "Why do we have to reinvent the wheel again and again?"

Read Behavior Problems: What Are Schools Obligated to Do?

Read more Frequently Asked Questions.

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Functional Behavior Assessments & Positive Interventions: What Parents Need to Know

Is the child a problem? Does the child have a problem? frustrated girl

Is suspending kids from school "good medicine for bad behavior?" Can we teach appropriate behavior skills to children?

In Functional Behavior Assessments & Positive Interventions: What Parents Need to Know, Dixie Jordan describes strategies that parents and teachers can use to assess problem behavior and teach appropriate behavior skills to children.

"Before we can teach appropriate behavior skills, we need to understand problem behaviors, such as where they occur and what purpose they serve for a child."

Learn about functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) and positive behavioral interventions in
Functional Behavior Assessments & Positive Interventions: What Parents Need to Know.

Learn more about school discipline.

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Functional Behavior Assessments: What? Why? When? Where? Who? by Stephen Starin, Ph.D.

If you are dealing with discipline or behavior issues, you need to learn about functional behavior assessments and behavior intervention plans.

In Functional Behavior Assessments: What? Why? When? Where? Who? by Stephen Starin, Ph.D., you will learn:

  • What is a "Functional Behavioral Assessment"?
  • Why Should Schools Do Functional Behavioral Assessments?
  • How Do You Determine the Cause or Function of Behavior?
  • How to Observe and Analyze Behavior in Natural Environment
  • Types of Problem Behavior
  • Systematic Manipulation of Environment
  • What About Qualifications and Training?
  • Don’t Waste Valuable Time!

Read Functional Behavior Assessments: What? Why? When? Where? Who? by Dr. Stephen Starin.

Learn about discipline & behavior issues.

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Just Published! My Brother Has Autism

A few weeks ago, we recommended My Brother Has Autism by Melody Igafo-Te'o. In My Brother Has Autism, 8 year-old Melody describes experiences with her brother Michael who has autism.

When we read Melody's book, we were surprised to learn how she views her brother. We were also surprised to learn that Michael, a talented artist, illustrated the book.

My Brother Has Autism is useful to therapists, teachers, parents, and others who work with siblings of children with autism. As children read and discuss this book, they recognize things they have in common with their sibling - and discover positive qualities about their brothers and sisters with autism.

My Brother Has Autism has been published as a paperback book and as an electronic book. Learn more.

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Wrightslaw Special Education Law & Advocacy Training
Wrightslaw special education law and advocacy training programs are designed to meet the needs of parents, advocates, attorneys, educators, health care providers, and others who represent the interests of children with disabilities and their families. Pete at a Boot Camp in OKC

Wrightslaw Special Ed Law & Advocacy Training (one day; 6 hours)

Wrightslaw Special Ed Law & Advocacy Boot Camp (two days; 12 hours)

IDEA 2004 and NCLB: What You Don't Know CAN Hurt You! (one day; 6 hours)

From Emotions to Advocacy (one day; 6 hours)

Private Training - Wrightslaw provides private training to agencies, organizations, private schools, clinics, etc. These programs are designed to meet the specific needs of members and are closed to the public.

We are scheduling programs for 2007 and 2008. If you are interested in bringing a Wrightslaw program to your community, please read our Conference Information page.

If you are interested in attending a program, please check the schedule to see where Wrightslaw programs are being held.

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