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Navigating College – a Handbook for Students with Autism

04/16/12
by Wrightslaw

Headed to college?

Worried about:

  • getting accommodations,
  • getting places on time,
  • dealing with sensory issues in a new environment.

Need advice on:

  • staying healthy at school,
  • good eating and sleeping habits,
  • dating and relationships,
  • independent living,
  • talking to your friends and classmates about your disability.

These can be complicated issues and big concerns for students on the autism spectrum. Get tips about how to make a smooth transition to college life from people who have “been there, done that” — get the new (free download) Navigating College Handbook

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network has some advice and experiences to share from those who have been there.  Their newly published Navigating College Handbook is an introduction to college developed in collaboration with Autism NOW with funding from the Administration on Developmental Disabilities.

Free download is available here: http://navigatingcollege.org/download.php

You will also find a link to this new Handbook on the following pages at Wrightslaw.

College and Continuing Education
Autism Spectrum – Free Pubs
Self- Advocacy

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3 responses so far ↓

  • 1 CHER 05/13/12 at 11:13 pm

    We were just told two weeks ago by our school district that we need to get intelligence testing and a psych evaluation done by January, 2013 for my child who will graduate next year. We were told that any college will require intelligence testing and the psych evaluation. They are offering to provide the testing. They said we can go have it done privately, but we will need to have this done by January. We thought we would just need to submit our child’s latest IEP and MFE. Has anyone heard of this? Before I go out and spend a lot of money having this done, I thought I would ask to see if anyone out there has heard of this. Thank you.

  • 2 Mike the Psych 04/23/12 at 9:45 am

    Unless “small group setting” is defined in the IEP then really it is open to interpretation. I suppose it could be argued that anything smaller than the average class size in that school would be small group.

    19 sounds a bit big but it depends how the room is set up and if students have enough space and privacy while testing.

    Next time you may want to define what the CRCT is as well (I had to look it up), different states have different measures.

  • 3 Deborah 04/16/12 at 4:51 pm

    I would like to know how many students should properly be placed in a small group setting when being tested for such test like the CRCT. Is 19 students to many for a small group setting.